Sunday, October 19, 2014
naterlies:

arthistorygifs:

Olympia - Édouard Manet
more info / frames / high res

A nice quick analysis of the painting in the gif and the 7 minute video linked, but sadly the discussion of Olympia’s maid is pretty much limited to noting the contrast between light and dark spaces. Olympia’s black maid is significant in the composition and she was certainly part of the public disgust when the painting was shown. I even learned about the painting last year in class, we called it ‘Olympia’s Maid’ not ‘Olympia’, which certainly changes the subject of the painting, though many other places seem to call the painting ‘Olympia’.
ANYWAY. The race of the maid IS significant - Manet made the choice to paint her as black, when he could easily have made her white. Manet plays on people’s expectations and turns them around in this painting - as the gif notes, Olympia is looking directly at the viewer, and not coyly away, and the broad brush strokes call attention to the fact this this IS a painting we’re looking at, not reality. Many in the 1860s believed black women were hyper sexual, the dangerous opposite of virginal white women. As a fully clothed and non-sexualized maid, she denies the viewer’s expectations by standing in such a stark contrast to Olympia (pretty obvious here - light/dark, unclothed/clothed). At the same time, stereotypes and her important placement in the image (she vertically divides half the painting and takes up a lot of space, in contrast to the woman in the background of ‘Venus of Urbino’) led many to speculate that there were also some shady lesbian themes goin’ on in the painting.
The very fact that Olympia’s maid takes up so much space in the painting and doesn’t fade into the background was contraversial. Though orientalist paintings that came in the next 20-30 years contrasted black and white  female bodies, the black women in those paintings were depicted in much more clearly subservient positions by bathing or dressing the white women who were meant to be looked upon as the subjects. While Olympia is still the subject in this painting, the addition of a black woman to an already offensive painting really pushed things over the edge for many art viewers.

naterlies:

arthistorygifs:

Olympia - Édouard Manet

more info / frames / high res

A nice quick analysis of the painting in the gif and the 7 minute video linked, but sadly the discussion of Olympia’s maid is pretty much limited to noting the contrast between light and dark spaces. Olympia’s black maid is significant in the composition and she was certainly part of the public disgust when the painting was shown. I even learned about the painting last year in class, we called it ‘Olympia’s Maid’ not ‘Olympia’, which certainly changes the subject of the painting, though many other places seem to call the painting ‘Olympia’.


ANYWAY. The race of the maid IS significant - Manet made the choice to paint her as black, when he could easily have made her white. Manet plays on people’s expectations and turns them around in this painting - as the gif notes, Olympia is looking directly at the viewer, and not coyly away, and the broad brush strokes call attention to the fact this this IS a painting we’re looking at, not reality. Many in the 1860s believed black women were hyper sexual, the dangerous opposite of virginal white women. As a fully clothed and non-sexualized maid, she denies the viewer’s expectations by standing in such a stark contrast to Olympia (pretty obvious here - light/dark, unclothed/clothed). At the same time, stereotypes and her important placement in the image (she vertically divides half the painting and takes up a lot of space, in contrast to the woman in the background of ‘Venus of Urbino’) led many to speculate that there were also some shady lesbian themes goin’ on in the painting.

The very fact that Olympia’s maid takes up so much space in the painting and doesn’t fade into the background was contraversial. Though orientalist paintings that came in the next 20-30 years contrasted black and white  female bodies, the black women in those paintings were depicted in much more clearly subservient positions by bathing or dressing the white women who were meant to be looked upon as the subjects. While Olympia is still the subject in this painting, the addition of a black woman to an already offensive painting really pushed things over the edge for many art viewers.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

renaissance-art:

Common Subjects of Renaissance Art: Susanna and the Elders

Thursday, October 16, 2014

renaissance-art:

Details from Botticelli’s Birth of Venus

Tuesday, October 14, 2014
surrealism:

The Eye of Surrealist Time by Salvador Dalí, 1971. Lithograph with etching on arches, 29 ¾ × 20 ½. DTR Modern Galleries, on display in Boston, MA: 2014-10-10 through 2014-11-28.

The most confusing element is the shadows cast by the butterflies as well as the man and the boy. But, if you cross your eyes, the man and the boy become two butterflies, flying upward and two the right. Or, perhaps, just one butterfly moving through time.

surrealism:

The Eye of Surrealist Time by Salvador Dalí, 1971. Lithograph with etching on arches, 29 ¾ × 20 ½. DTR Modern Galleries, on display in Boston, MA: 2014-10-10 through 2014-11-28.

The most confusing element is the shadows cast by the butterflies as well as the man and the boy. But, if you cross your eyes, the man and the boy become two butterflies, flying upward and two the right. Or, perhaps, just one butterfly moving through time.

Sunday, October 5, 2014
renemagritte-art:

The titanic days, 1928
Rene Magritte

renemagritte-art:

The titanic days, 1928

Rene Magritte

Monday, September 29, 2014

falatjakvb:

dieweltvongestern:

Tomorrow, Orsay. ;)

Best rage leave

(Source: kovacsed)

catherinefaulkner:

A re-working of one my old ones. 

catherinefaulkner:

A re-working of one my old ones. 

incidentalcomics:

American Art

This comic originally appeared in my series “Who Needs Art?” for Medium.com. Our country’s Congress may be inept, but our art is still pretty great.

Andy Warhol - In the future everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes

(Source: moonchild30)

Friday, September 19, 2014

Meester met de Papegaai, Detail of The Suicide of Lucretia, 1525

Meester met de Papegaai, Detail of The Suicide of Lucretia, 1525

(Source: deathandmysticism)

Thursday, September 18, 2014
hipinuff:

René Magritte (Belgian: 1898–1967), The White Race (La Race blanche), 1937. Oil on canvas; 81 × 60 cm.

hipinuff:

René Magritte (Belgian: 1898–1967), The White Race (La Race blanche), 1937. Oil on canvas; 81 × 60 cm.

Monday, September 15, 2014
pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “The Stillness of Time”, 1975

Also known as “La Noblesse du Temps, Persistance de la memoire”, Dali infused this masterpiece with elements he depicted during his own lifelong obsession with sex and the fleeting passage of time. With the bravura of an Old Master draftsman, Dalí delineates with great flourish the figures flanking the melting timepiece.
Sensuously rendered, Venus stands at the left holding a mirror, an attribute for vanity and lust.  She is self-absorbed and seemingly unaware that she is entangled in Vulcan’s net. At the right sits an angel, a divine messenger of life and death, in contemplation before the keeper of time in our waking state. In the dream state, however, the watch or clock is no longer relevant; our reality has morphed the distortion of time and memories become obfuscated. <source>

pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “The Stillness of Time”, 1975

Also known as “La Noblesse du Temps, Persistance de la memoire”, Dali infused this masterpiece with elements he depicted during his own lifelong obsession with sex and the fleeting passage of time. With the bravura of an Old Master draftsman, Dalí delineates with great flourish the figures flanking the melting timepiece.

Sensuously rendered, Venus stands at the left holding a mirror, an attribute for vanity and lust.  She is self-absorbed and seemingly unaware that she is entangled in Vulcan’s net. At the right sits an angel, a divine messenger of life and death, in contemplation before the keeper of time in our waking state. In the dream state, however, the watch or clock is no longer relevant; our reality has morphed the distortion of time and memories become obfuscated. <source>

Saturday, September 13, 2014
damaximosguyart:

Conceptual sketch for vertebrae and spinal cord relation #scientificillustration #anatomy #vertebrae #spinalnerves

damaximosguyart:

Conceptual sketch for vertebrae and spinal cord relation #scientificillustration #anatomy #vertebrae #spinalnerves

thoughtsonahill:

Pablo Picasso, in front of Guernica

(Source: madebyabvh)

Monday, September 8, 2014

wtfarthistory:

Views of Michelangelo’s David